LAUNCH EFFECT

Vitamin C and Natural Depression Treatment

Depression is a classic early symptom of vitamin C deficiency. (Robert E. 1971) In a vitamin C deprivation study, symptoms of depression, hypochondriasis, hysteria, reduced arousal and reduced motivational were documented. (Robert A. 1971) In a study of 1081 young men, those who were vitamin C deficient were significantly more anxious and people deficient in vitamin C were also significantly more depressed based on ratings from the Adjective checklist, although not more depressed based on the Frieburg personality inventory scale. (Heseker H. 1992)

Vitamin C is a cofactor for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (Kaufman S. 1966), which is involved in the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, and a cofactor for tryptophan-5-hydroxylase required for the conversion of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan (Cooper JR. 1961) in serotonin production. Vitamin C also has broad-spectrum antioxidant properties and is essential for the mitochondrial metabolism of fats. (Mann. 2000)

A group of patients depressed for 2-5 months had significantly reduced levels of vitamin C as compared to the non-depressed control group. (Singh RB. 1995) Another group of 885 patients in a psychiatric hospital had significantly lower vitamin C levels than controls, reporting 32% had readings below the range in which negative health effects have been clearly documented. (Schorah CJ. 1983) A group of chronic mixed psychiatric patients required a longer time period to achieve vitamin C saturation upon supplementation, suggesting lower vitamin C status. (G Milner. 1963) Another study reported over 10% of 465 psychiatric inpatients had markedly delayed vitamin C saturation indicating some degree of vitamin C insufficiency. (Leitner ZA. 1956)

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